No Kid Hungry will continue updating this page as new guidance and resources become available.

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Program Options & Nationwide Waivers
Meals outside for COVID

This section breaks down the waivers, program options, and service models currently available and provides an update on the status of waivers going forward.

Congress recently passed the Keep Kids Fed Act, which extends the USDA's authority to issue nationwide waivers for Summer 2022 operations, provides more limited nationwide waiver authority for School Year 2022-2023, and offers additional per-meal reimbursement rates for one year. For more details on the Keep Kids Fed Act, please see our summary.

It is important to note that this is more limited than the previous extensions of USDA's nationwide child nutrition waiver authority, and it will not permit USDA to allow schools to operate through the Seamless Summer Option (SSO) and offer meals at no charge to all students next school year. Schools will need to return to operating the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program and collecting free or reduced-price meal eligibility applications, unless the school elects the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP). Likewise, except for those in states that have passed state legislation to support school meals for all (California, Maine and Vermont), schools will need to resume charging students for meals if they are not eligible for free school meals, unless the school has adopted CEP or another non-pricing provision. 

The Summary of Current COVID-19 Child Nutrition Response Waivers will be updated with the latest guidance once USDA issues new waivers.

Resources

Coronavirus
School Lunch
Summer Meals

Keep Kids Fed Act: Update for Summer 2022 & SY22-23

New legislation extends the USDA's authority to issue nationwide waivers for Summer 2022 operations, provides more limited nationwide waiver authority for School Year 2022-2023, and offers additional per-meal reimbursement rates for one year.

Policy & Legislation
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Summer 2022
boy holding his meal

The Summer Food Service Program and NSLP Seamless Summer Option provide nutritious meals to children when school is not in session. Find related resources and updates here.

Before the passage of the Keep Kids Fed Act in late June, USDA did not have the authority to extend or issue nationwide waivers throughout Summer 2022. However, state agencies can request waivers on behalf of sponsors in their state. Please reach out to your state agency to learn what flexibilities may be available in your state. For more details on the status of waivers and expiration dates, see the section on Program Options & Nationwide Waivers.

Anticipating changes to your summer meals program? Be sure to communicate program changes early and often with families. Check out our Toolkit for Communicating Summer Meals 2022 Operations Changes
to Parents and Families
 for sample language to include in letters to families, on flyers, and over social media. The Toolkit includes drafted language for programs changing operations and ceasing operations (available in English and Spanish!). 

Many sites across the country will be transitioning to congregate meal service where children eat their summer meals onsite. Feeding a Crowd - Tips for Congregate Meal Service provides strategies to make congregate meal service easier for site staff and improve the experience for children and families. Check it out to learn how to create a welcoming and fun environment and also learn tips for communicating program requirements to site staff and families. 

In order to operate an open meal site this summer, sites must be determined area eligible. Determining if your site is area eligible can be complicated. Navigating Area Eligibility in Summer and Afterschool Meals Program provides information on how to determine if a site is area eligible, the types of data that can be used to make that determination, and options for meal service if a site is not area eligible. It also outlines flexibilities available for what data can be used to determine eligibility for summer 2022 and the 2022-2023 school year.

Need a refresher of what summer meals operations look like without waivers? This resource, SFSP & SSO Requirements - Comparison Chart of Usual vs. COVID-19 Waiver Operations, briefly reviews program provisions of waiver vs. traditional summer meals operations.  

Check out No Kid Hungry's Summer Webinar Series: School's Out, Food's In to learn more:

  • March 30th 3-4pm EST - Planning for Summer: Operation Strategies Without Waivers 
    As it stands today, waivers and flexibilities previously available during the pandemic in the Summer Meals Program (SFSP and SSO) will not be available for summer 2022. On this webinar, No Kid Hungry will share the latest regulatory update, and Donna Martin, Director of School Nutrition at Burke County Public School District (GA), and Melissa Weissler, Senior Manager of Child and Community Nutrition at Operation Food Search (MO), will talk through their plans and strategies for operating summer meals without waivers.
    Recording Available Here
  • April 13th 1-2pm EST - Reaching Hard to Reach Communities: Leveraging innovation and Partnership
    Reaching hard-to-reach communities requires innovation and partnership. This webinar will feature Lynsi Barnhill of Paducah Public Schools, Constance Moore of the YMCA of Memphis and the Mid-South, and Ceara Chirovsky of St. Mary’s Food Bank. The speakers all have experience feeding rural and hard-to-reach communities using innovative models like mobile meal programs, freeze and thaw programs, and more. They will also discuss how they approach building relationships and trust with communities - the foundation for successful summer meals programs.
    Recording Available Here
  • April 26th 3-4pm EST - Summer Meals 101: Back to Basics & USDA Update 
    Ready to go back to basics? Join No Kid Hungry for a refresher on “usual” (non-waiver) summer meals operations and a regulatory update from USDA. Summer 2022 will look different from summer 2020 and 2021 operations. Waivers previously used to serve grab & go and bulk style meals are no longer available. This webinar will remind providers of summer meals “basics” as we approach summer 2022 operations. There will be time at the end of the presentations for audience Q&A with No Kid Hungry and USDA.
    Recording Available Here
  • May 17th 2-3pm EST - Promoting Your Summer Meals Program
    Raising awareness about your summer meals program is key to ensuring children and families have access to meals all summer long. Whether you are a sponsor, site, or advocate, you have a role in spreading the word about summer meals. On this webinar, you will hear from Lynsi Barnhill from Paducah Public Schools and Sara Seelmeyer from the United Way of King County on how they promote their summer meals programs.
    Recording Available Here
  • June 9th 3-4pm EST - Evaluating and Incorporating Feedback Into Your Summer Meals Program: Tips and promising practices
    Using evaluation and feedback can help your summer meals program be a success. Join No Kid Hungry to learn how three summer meals sponsors incorporate site, community, and kid’s feedback to improve their programs. You’ll hear from Eugenie Sellier from Feeding Alabama, Nicole Lowe from the YMCA of Greater Seattle, and Constance Moore from the YMCA of Memphis and the Mid-South.
    Recording Available Here
  • July 20th 3-4pm EST - Thinking 365: Transition your summer meals program to year-round through CACFP At-risk
    Summer is almost over, but your meal program doesn’t have to be! Listen in for the final webinar in No Kid Hungry’s School’s Out, Food’s In summer webinar series. In this webinar, you will learn from program sponsors about how they successfully transition their summer program to year-round operations using CACFP At-risk Afterschool Meals. Presenters include Eugenie Sellier from Feeding Alabama, Melissa Weissler from Operation Food Search, and Walter Campbell from Charleston County School District.
    Register Here

Additional resources and trainings on summer meals can be found on our Summer Meals program page including a Summer Meals Outreach Toolkit where you can download resources and language to spread the word about the availability of summer meals in your community!

Resources

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Engaging the School Community
COVID meal distribution

The resources in this section will help you engage your school community to support the success of your school meals program.

For Families

School meals can be a lifeline for families. Free and reduced price (FRP) meals can relieve some of the financial struggles school meals place upon families. In order to receive FRP meals, families must apply through their school. Many families are not aware of this, and also have no idea that with the FRP application comes the possibility of benefits beyond just FRP meals. For instance, some states offer discounted internet services, housing services, and discounted college application fees. Each state is different in terms of the benefits they offer to families. Outreach about FRP meal applications can be helpful to inform families about these benefits, and improve submission rates of FRP applications. No Kid Hungry's School Meals Application Outreach Toolkit streamlines the outreach process for schools by providing guidance about communication to families, outreach examples from other districts, and customizable fliers, social media posts and graphics in English and Spanish to connect with families.

Asking families for their feedback about meal service can help you make informed decisions for your program and ultimately increase participation. Gathering Feedback From Families: Using a Survey to Inform Meal Service details the use of a survey to gather feedback from families. Within this resource you will find general guidance and a link to a sample survey so that you can see those recommendations in action.

In early 2021, No Kid Hungry engaged FM3—a California-based company that conducts opinion research—to complete a national series of discussion boards and surveys with parents and students in low- and middle-income households to assess their views of school meals, and to assess their reactions to key messaging designed to encourage greater participation. The goal of the research was to understand, as we begin to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, what opportunities may exist to increase parent and student engagement with school meals – both in and out of session. Recommendations for Communicating with Students & Families About School Meals highlights the key recommendations to emerge from the research.

 

 

For Educators & Administrators

School Meals: Valuable to Kids, Schools & Communities explains why school meals are so critical for students and how school meals programs operate. It also offers ideas on how to engage key staff within the schools, from teachers to custodians, in order to make new meal service models successful. 

How School Meals Can Support Social-Emotional School Climates highlights how expanding participation in the school meals program can nourish students while simultaneously building social-emotional learning skills.

The case study, Adapting School Nutrition During COVID-19, also shares best practices from Vaughn Next Century Learning Center on how they successfully engage the broader school community in the design and implementation of their school meals program.

Resources

School Lunch
School Breakfast
Elementary school Girl walking through the cafeteria lunch line with a big smile on her face, pushing her tray filled with food.

School Meals Application Outreach Toolkit

Customizable Templates & Materials
Engaging Stakeholders
Outreach & Promotion Materials
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Parents & Families
School Nutrition Staff
Afterschool Meals
School Breakfast
Schools as Nutrition Hubs
two elementary school boys reaching for school meals

School Meals: Valuable to Kids, Schools & Communities

School meals are essential to student health and academic success, and they support the local economy. They are a win-win!

Engaging Stakeholders
Outreach & Promotion Materials
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Advocates
Educators
No Kid Hungry Partners
Coronavirus
School Lunch
Summer Meals
Alicia Escoto serves meals to students

Adapting School Nutrition During COVID-19

Vaughn Food Services continues to reach kids during COVID-19 by collaborating with families and the entire Vaughn staff, and by serving meals that kids love.

Case Studies
Innovative Approaches & Successful Models
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School Nutrition Staff
School Lunch
School Breakfast
Summer Meals
Boys eating breakfast in the classroom

Recommendations for Communicating with Students & Families About School Meals

This resource highlights the key recommendations to emerge from research conducted in 2021 with parents and students in low- and middle-income households to assess their views of school meals, and to assess their reactions to key messaging designed to encourage greater participation.

Engaging Stakeholders
Outreach & Promotion Materials
Research & Data
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No Kid Hungry Partners
Nonprofit Sponsors
School Nutrition Staff
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How Community Eligibility (CEP) Can Help
Parent and student taking grab n go meal

The Community Eligibility Provision enables eligible schools to serve free meals to all students, regardless of income. Adopting CEP in SY22-23 can help your school district continue feeding all students at no cost.

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) is a special school meal funding option of the National School Lunch Act that enables schools to provide free meals to all students. Under CEP, school meals are available to all students at no cost to them, just like textbooks and transportation. As pandemic waivers expire, school districts can use CEP to continue feeding all students breakfast and lunch at no cost.

New CEP Resources:

  • Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) Communications Toolkit
    Making sure your students, families, teachers, community, and staff know about your district's transition to Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) is critical to its success. This toolkit provides school nutrition departments with strategies and tips to effectively communicate about CEP and the availability of free school meals for all students. The toolkit also has downloadable and customizable social media graphics, banners, posters and more for you to use to spread the word about free school meals for all students in your district. 
  • Alternative Income Forms: Understanding What They Are, Why They're Important, & How They're Collected
    Alternative income forms are completed by families in replacement of free and reduced-price meal applications when a school or district in certain states utilizes the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP). This resource details what alternative income forms are, why they are important, and how they are collected.
  • Identified Student Percentage (ISP) Management: Increasing & Maximizing Your District’s ISP
    Increasing your Identified Student Percentage (ISP) can be one of the most effective ways to boost your school nutrition budget revenue. This resource outlines several ways your district can increase and maximize your ISP. It also includes key grouping tools!
  • Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) Meal Claiming 101
    The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) ensures that all students can participate in school breakfast and lunch at no cost. It also changes how a school nutrition department can count and claim meals and operate point-of-service. This resource explains how meals are counted and claimed at schools using CEP and provides tips for point-of-service.
  • UPDATED! Strategies for Finding Success with CEP
    This resource describes strategies that maximize the benefit of CEP and school nutrition finances. Strategies described in the resource include increasing your ISP, managing program costs, exploring additional avenues for revenue generation, and increasing participation in school meals.

At this time, all of the usual CEP deadlines still apply, including the April 1st deadline for data used to calculate a schools identified student percentage and the June 30th election deadline. However, some states have applied and have been granted CEP deadline extensions. Please check with your state agency to learn what deadlines apply in your state. For more CEP deadlines, see this USDA memo and Planning & Implementation Guidance

CEP benefits students and schools. Kids get free meals, and when a child’s nutritional needs are met, they do better in school. CEP can reduce financial strain at home for families facing economic hardship due to COVID-19 and/or systematic inequalities. CEP promotes equity by eliminating the out-of-pocket costs for families and reducing stigma for school meals programs.

CEP is good for schools, too. It reduces administrative burden by eliminating school meals applications, counting and claiming by fee category, and unpaid meal charges. School nutrition staff are able to streamline meal service, making it easier to implement innovative service models, like meals in the classroom and hybrid schedules. These benefits taken together often result in CEP generating revenue for school nutrition budgets - CEP schools eliminate many overhead costs, eliminate school meal debt, and increase participation. Moreover, CEP is a 4-year cycle, meaning that adopting CEP this year can help a school's nutrition budget recover post-pandemic.

What do I do if I can't implement CEP in all of my schools?
Sometimes, not of all the schools in a district are eligible for CEP or CEP is not financially viable district-wide. In these cases, districts can still benefit from implementing CEP is some of their schools. This is sometimes called site-based or partial CEP. Learn more with Tips for Making Site-based/Partial CEP Work.

Learn more about CEP, including eligibility and applications, program operations, and FAQs, on our dedicated CEP page and download this one-page program overview. Also be sure to check out MealsCount - an online tool that can analyze your district's data to optimize the program - and the No Kid Hungry CEP Calculator - a financial and grouping analysis tool. Have questions or need extra support? Email us at bestpractices@strength.org - we are here to help.

Check out our CEP Week videos! These short (10-15 minute) videos highlight important aspects of electing CEP. What will you learn?

  • Day 1 – Is CEP Right for You?
  • Day 2 – CEP Financials
  • Day 3 – CEP and Your Central Business Officer 
  • Day 4 – Maximizing ISP
  • Day 5 – Measuring CEP Success

Learn More about CEP in FRAC's CEP Webinar Series

  • CEP Kickoff Webinar SY2022-2023
    Community Eligibility season is upon us! The past two school years have highlighted the value of offering school meals at no charge to all students. As we look ahead to the 2022-2023 school year and the potential return to normal school nutrition operations, a few things are clear: community eligibility offers school districts and schools the opportunity to provide free breakfast and lunch to all students for four school years. Join this webinar as we discuss basics and benefits of community eligibility, along with resources and tools available to aid in the adoption process.
  • CEP: Overcoming the Loss of School Meal Application Data
    Community eligibility eliminates the need to collect school meal applications, which have long been used for a wide range of education and funding purposes. Join us for this webinar to learn how schools across the country have been able to successfully overcome the loss of this data in order to offer free meals to all of their students. FRAC is joined by Todd Stephenson, U.S. Department of Education; Fatimah Abdullahi, U.S. Department of Education; and Kristin Blagg, Urban Institute.
  • Making CEP Work with Low ISPs and Partial District Implementation
    The pandemic has highlighted the value of offering school meals at no charge to all students. Community Eligibility provides an excellent opportunity for high poverty schools to offer free breakfast and lunch to all students beyond the 2021-2022 school year. The community eligibility reimbursement formula determines what percent of meals are reimbursed at the free and paid rates. Thousands of schools and districts across the country have experienced the benefits of community eligibility by participating with ISPs below 60 percent and by having individual schools participate within a district. Watch this webinar to learn about the strategies and resources available for making community eligibility work with low ISPs and/or partial district implementation.
  • June 9th at 3pm EST - Get Your CEP Questions Answered
    As your school or district considers Community Eligibility for the upcoming school year, join us and our panel of experts and stakeholders from a variety of backgrounds to get your questions answered. We will be answering questions on grouping, eligibility, maximizing reimbursement rates, making CEP work financially, setting ISPs, direct certification, and a variety of other topics. We encourage attendees to submit any questions they may have beforehand using the form here.
  • Upcoming webinars can be found here!

Resources

CEP
Boys eating breakfast in the classroom

Providing Universal Free School Meals

Compare three options for providing universal free school meals: the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP), Provision 2, and non-pricing.

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Program Overview
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CEP
School Nutrition Employee Smiles While Preparing Food

Strategies for Finding Success with CEP

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) ensures that all students can participate in school breakfast and lunch at no cost to them, and CEP can also benefit school nutrition finances. This resource outlines strategies designed to help you maximize the benefits of CEP by increasing your Identified Student Percentage (ISP), managing program costs, generating revenue with savvy business practices, and improving meal participation rates.

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Meal Service Operation Resources
Cafeteria Line in COVID

The resources in this section were designed to help school nutrition staff plan for meal service operations under a variety of scenarios.

Equipment List 

Our Equipment List for School Meal Service This resource lists the equipment you can use for school meal service whether meals are being served in the cafeteria, the classroom, or elsewhere on the campus. It includes ideas for repurposing equipment that you may already have and options to consider for new or replacement equipment needs.

Feeding Remote Learners

Serving virtual students is an important way to ensure students are fed and stay connected to their school community. The Serving Remote Learners: Meal Service Model Guide outlines the steps school districts can take to determine the need for virtual student meal service, evaluate their capacity to provide meals, and choose a service model(s) that best fits their community needs. Tips & Considerations for Serving Remote Learners is a one-page quick guide on how to serve remote learners. 

Alternative Meal Service Models

Alternative meal service models, such as Grab n’ Go and meals in the classroom, can provide more flexibility for students, leading to increased meal participation. These alternative service models use portable equipment that enable schools to serve food with the same high-quality meal standards and variety as traditional cafeteria dinning. Additionally, alternative meal service models can be utilized anytime, not just during emergency situations, to ensure students are able to access meals conveniently and efficiently during the school day. Learn more with Increasing Participation Through Alternative Meal Service Models.

Navigating Supply Chain Disruptions

Supply chain disruptions can create challenges with procurement, menu planning, and service. Watch the Navigating Supply Chain Disruptions webinar to hear tips and advice from three school nutrition professionals managing disruptions in their schools. Also check out Tips for Navigating Supply Chain Disruptions which provides tips for managing supply chain related issues including driver, food, and equipment shortages in a quick one-page document. Communication is an important part of navigating supply chain disruptions. Check out No Kid Hungry's Materials for Communicating with Your School Community for sample language, in both English & Spanish, that you can use as is or customize to best fit the needs of your school or district. Just copy & paste! Also, check out SNA's video, "Supply Chain Issues & School Meals - What Parents Need to Know" available in English and Spanish

Rural schools and community providers utilize their agrarian geographies to bring local fruits, vegetables, and even meats and eggs to their meal programs. This close connection to their local farmers and ranchers has created a system that can overcome common supply chain disruptions, invest in their local economy, and create engaging educational opportunities. Learn more about how you can connect with your local food system in No Kid Hungry's Rural Communities Leading the Way: Introducing Local Foods to Meal Service resource. 

Addressing Staffing Shortages

With nationwide labor and supply shortages impacting every corner of the economy, many school districts have been utilizing creative and innovative solutions to recruit and retain more kitchen staffers and persevere through this challenging time. No Kid Hungry highlighted the best and promising practices gathered from around the country in Staffing Up: Strategies for Working Through Labor Shortage Challenges. For example, some districts have found success by recruiting volunteers such as high school and college students who have the flexibility to add a few hours per week to help prep or serve school meals, as well as add valuable experience to their resume. Other districts have been able to increase compensation for school nutrition staffers, or provide bonuses for their hard work. We've seen districts incorporate savvy advertising practices to their job recruitment process, such as connecting with local restaurants and food businesses, advertising open positions throughout the community, and hiring parents of kids who go to the district. And finally, finding creative ways to make the most of staff on hand by adjusting staff schedules to meet food service needs, changing the menu to accommodate staff availability, and investing in high quality equipment, such as packaging equipment, to lessen the load of food service staffers, are all tactics districts have used to meet their food service needs while navigating staffing shortages. 

Resources

Afterschool Meals
School Lunch
School Breakfast
BAB GNG

Equipment List For School Meal Service

This resource lists the equipment you can use for school meal service whether meals are being served in the cafeteria, the classroom, or elsewhere on the campus.

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No Kid Hungry Partners
School Nutrition Staff
Afterschool Meals
Coronavirus
Rural Communities
School Lunch
School Breakfast
Summer Meals

Tips for Navigating Supply Chain Disruptions

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Nonprofit Sponsors
Program Sites
School Nutrition Staff
School Lunch
School Breakfast
School Nutrition Employee Smiles While Preparing Food

Staffing Up: Strategies for Working Through Labor Shortage Challenges

This resource offers best practices used by school kitchens across the nation to recruit and retain staff. Practices such as recruiting volunteers, expanding staff benefits, utilizing creative logistics, and advertising at every opportunity!

Implementation Support
Innovative Approaches & Successful Models
Best for:
No Kid Hungry Partners
School Nutrition Staff
School Lunch
School Breakfast
Elementary school girl sitting at her desk eating school breakfast.

Increasing Participation through Alternative Meal Service Models

Alternative meal service models can be utilized anytime to ensure students are able to access meals conveniently and efficiently during the school day.

Engaging Stakeholders
Implementation Support
Innovative Approaches & Successful Models
Best for:
Educators
No Kid Hungry Partners
School Nutrition Staff
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Afterschool Meals Resources
women packs meals into boxes

Both school and community organizations can help feed kids this school year with afterschool meals and snacks.

Both school and non-school sponsors have the opportunity serve meals and snacks during School Year 2021-2022 through the CACFP At-Risk Afterschool Meals component. Schools can serve afterschool meals and snacks in conjunction with the Seamless Summer Option or NSLP and SBP. Additionally, schools can offer afterschool snacks through NSLP.  

In order to operate an open afterschool meal site in the 2022-2023 school year, sites must be determined area eligible. Determining if your site is area eligible can be complicated. Navigating Area Eligibility in Summer and Afterschool Meals Program provides information on how to determine if a site is area eligible, the types of data that can be used to make that determination, and options for meal service if a site is not area eligible. It also outlines flexibilities available for what data can be used to determine eligibility for summer 2022 and the 2022-2023 school year.

The afterschool enrichment waiver issued in the spring of 2020 has not been extended; however, virtual and take-home activities may be options in your state. Combined with the availability of the non-congregate, meal service time, and parent or guardian meal pick-up waivers for the CACFP and NSLP in SY21-22, this may permit bulk meal distribution for off-site consumption. However, these waivers are only available this school year for the duration and to the extent necessary, so work with your state agency on your operational plans based on the situation in your community. If you are operating a grab & go or delivery program, meal pick-up or delivery confirmations can count as the attendance tracking requirement (see Question 41 in USDA's Q&A). Please check with your state agency on this and all alternative operations.  

Also, please note that previous Q&A guidance from USDA indicates that the meal service time waiver does not allow for meal distribution during the school day if children are attending an in-person school or in-person program for virtual learners. Additionally, please work with your state agency regarding expectations for attendance records.  

If you're looking for ideas on virtual activities, we have compiled suggestions and links to last several months. We also have a resource with links to printable materials that can be distributed along with meals if your sites served children who may not have reliable access to technology. 

Resources

Afterschool Meals
Coronavirus

Virtual Enrichment Activities

This provides links to online activities that can be shared with kids in order to meet the afterschool enrichment activity requirement while providing non-congregate meals. These activites are also great alongside non-congregate summer meals!

Customizable Templates & Materials
Implementation Support
Best for:
Nonprofit Sponsors
Program Sites
School Nutrition Staff
Afterschool Meals
Coronavirus

Print Enrichment Activity Materials

This provides links to worksheets and handouts that can be printed and distributed along with non-congregate meals in order to meet the afterschool enrichment activity requirement.

Implementation Support
Best for:
Nonprofit Sponsors
Program Sites
School Nutrition Staff